laura c. 20-something. new nyc resident transplanted from california. theater & english nerd. feminist. television enthusiast. fat activist. queer. a loving cynic.
July 11th
7:18 PM
Via
thepeoplesrecord:


The App you should download today - Police Tape
Citizens can hold police accountable in the palms of their hands with “Police Tape,” a smartphone application from the ACLU of New Jersey that allows people to securely and discreetly record and store interactions with police, as well as provide legal information about citizens’ rights when interacting with the police. Thanks to the generosity of app developer OpenWatch, the ACLU-NJ is providing Police Tape to the public free of charge.
Download Police Tape here. Reblog & share!

thepeoplesrecord:

The App you should download today - Police Tape

Citizens can hold police accountable in the palms of their hands with “Police Tape,” a smartphone application from the ACLU of New Jersey that allows people to securely and discreetly record and store interactions with police, as well as provide legal information about citizens’ rights when interacting with the police. Thanks to the generosity of app developer OpenWatch, the ACLU-NJ is providing Police Tape to the public free of charge.

Download Police Tape here. Reblog & share!

June 28th
7:07 AM
Via
erstwhilegirl:


I laughed, but now I’m sad.




YEP.

erstwhilegirl:

I laughed, but now I’m sad.

YEP.

June 22nd
6:14 PM
Via
newyorker:


This Sunday, as every fourth Sunday in June, the streets of New York will fill with prideful marchers celebrating Pride Month. There will be similar marches, too, in cities around the country. Sunday marks the forty-third year since the uprising in a Greenwich Village bar called Stonewall that supposedly started the modern gay revolution. The myth is that a few hundred angry people acted out in lower Manhattan, and the world changed. Maybe that’s where Occupy Wall Street got the idea that this is how it’s done. 
It’s the wrong lesson… Their achievement is a field guide to how to make a social movement, and also offers insight into why Occupy is failing.

What Stonewall got right, and Occupy got wrong: http://nyr.kr/L8gITl

newyorker:

This Sunday, as every fourth Sunday in June, the streets of New York will fill with prideful marchers celebrating Pride Month. There will be similar marches, too, in cities around the country. Sunday marks the forty-third year since the uprising in a Greenwich Village bar called Stonewall that supposedly started the modern gay revolution. The myth is that a few hundred angry people acted out in lower Manhattan, and the world changed. Maybe that’s where Occupy Wall Street got the idea that this is how it’s done. 

It’s the wrong lesson… Their achievement is a field guide to how to make a social movement, and also offers insight into why Occupy is failing.

What Stonewall got right, and Occupy got wrong: http://nyr.kr/L8gITl

June 14th
9:49 PM
Via
owsposters:


Contributed piece.
Copyright all rights reserved by Kip Lyall.
Curator’s Note: We think this is, by far, the most poignant and meaning-packed political cartoon to have thus far been spawned from the OWS Movement. 

owsposters:

Contributed piece.

Copyright all rights reserved by Kip Lyall.

Curator’s Note: We think this is, by far, the most poignant and meaning-packed political cartoon to have thus far been spawned from the OWS Movement. 

8:08 AM
Via
owsposters:


Zero Jobs
Download the poster pack




Relevant: Did Republicans Deliberately Crash the US Economy? (Answer: all signs point to yes.)

owsposters:

Zero Jobs

Download the poster pack

Relevant: Did Republicans Deliberately Crash the US Economy? (Answer: all signs point to yes.)

November 28th
11:30 AM

Meant to share this a while ago. Getting junk mail from credit card companies? Here’s what you should do!

November 21st
5:34 PM

The Human Mic: Not Just for Occupy

"It’s an invention of necessity that nicely reinforces the protesters’ messages of community, horizontalism, and strength in numbers. Also, it can’t be confiscated by police."

"We have yet to see what the next step for Occupy Wall Street will be. But the movement’s lasting legacy may include a handy lo-fi trick that future protesters can use to turn the tables anywhere, anytime, no equipment necessary."

2:58 PM

Occupy The First Personal Plural

The ironic thing about all those posts on the bottom half of the Internet demanding that Occupy protesters stick to individual action to improve their individual lives, rather than collective action to improve the lives of their class, is that making such a post is itself a collective action. Each of those messages was typed on a computer designed and built by other people, processed by software thought up and implemented by other people, transmitted by electrical lines laid by other people, written in a language developed over the course of centuries by other people… and you can say that about virtually everything we do. Everything one accomplishes is really an achievement of multitudes. So if we contend that some of the income from those accomplishments must be shared with one’s network of collaborators, i.e., the rest of society — if we point out how absurd it is to think that 1% of the population could be responsible for, and therefore deserve, 40% of the common wealth — if we say that our current lopsided distribution of that wealth is therefore indicative of serious systemic problems that need to be fixed — then, sure, a libertarian can try to argue against us. But what he can’t do is say that it’s somehow illegitimate to make these kinds of decisions for anyone other than oneself. If it’s legitimate to collectively invent the notion of property and decide on rules about it that apply to all of us, then it’s equally legitimate to change those rules via the same method.

(Bolding mine.)

An interesting take on this situation. And (though it has less to do with the quote above and more with an earlier part of that essay) I particularly find the highlighting of pronoun semantics interesting, because it actually does play a huge part in the dialogue around both the Occupy movement, and class issues generally. When we decide to treat and refer to people as individuals, versus when we consider them part of a larger entity, is incredibly important.

Sometimes nothing saddens me more than the phrase “just semantics”. Semantics matters.

8:30 AM
Via
theatlantic:

What George Orwell Can Teach Us About Police Brutality

Over the years, I’ve heard a fair number of slurs shouted at campus cops. Seldom were they “pig” or “fascist.” Far more often, they diminished the power of the officer, using words like “fake cop” or “rent-a-cop”.This is where the power and class dynamics get tricky.They are real cops. Employed by California, they are agents of the state. They’ve got weapons. And the pay is not bad at all. On the other hand, campus police at U.C. Berkeley, and to a lesser extent at U.C. Davis, patrol kids who’d call themselves failures if they grew up to be cops; kids who have more opportunities than the children of the campus cops; kids who will mostly be more successful than campus cops; kids who even enjoy the ultimate loyalty of U.C. faculty and most administrators. Just look at what happened after U.C. Berkeley administrators sent in cops with batons, and U.C. Davis administrators sent in cops with pepper spray. Predictable altercations occurred. Batons and pepper spray were used. Images leaked. And suddenly the administrators were launching investigations! And issuing statements about how deeply they cared for the students! Did they fail to anticipate that the weapons would be turned on passive protesters? 
They’d do well to read “Shooting an Elephant,” George Orwell’s reflection on his time as a British imperial police officer in Burma, if so. To be clear, I don’t think imperialism is an apt analogy when police forcibly remove Occupy Cal or Davis protesters. But I do think Orwell helps us understand why officers who aren’t monsters might use wildly excessive force. Read more.

theatlantic:

What George Orwell Can Teach Us About Police Brutality

Over the years, I’ve heard a fair number of slurs shouted at campus cops. Seldom were they “pig” or “fascist.” Far more often, they diminished the power of the officer, using words like “fake cop” or “rent-a-cop”.

This is where the power and class dynamics get tricky.

They are real cops. Employed by California, they are agents of the state. They’ve got weapons. And the pay is not bad at all. 

On the other hand, campus police at U.C. Berkeley, and to a lesser extent at U.C. Davis, patrol kids who’d call themselves failures if they grew up to be cops; kids who have more opportunities than the children of the campus cops; kids who will mostly be more successful than campus cops; kids who even enjoy the ultimate loyalty of U.C. faculty and most administrators. Just look at what happened after U.C. Berkeley administrators sent in cops with batons, and U.C. Davis administrators sent in cops with pepper spray. Predictable altercations occurred. Batons and pepper spray were used. Images leaked. And suddenly the administrators were launching investigations! And issuing statements about how deeply they cared for the students! Did they fail to anticipate that the weapons would be turned on passive protesters? 

They’d do well to read “Shooting an Elephant,” George Orwell’s reflection on his time as a British imperial police officer in Burma, if so. To be clear, I don’t think imperialism is an apt analogy when police forcibly remove Occupy Cal or Davis protesters. But I do think Orwell helps us understand why officers who aren’t monsters might use wildly excessive force. Read more.