laura c. 20-something. new nyc resident transplanted from california. theater & english nerd. feminist. television enthusiast. fat activist. queer. a loving cynic.
August 27th
6:54 PM
Via
boesed:


warbyparker:

Whoa. The MLA has officially devised a standard format to cite tweets in an academic paper. Sign of the times.

ebooks, Horse. (horse_ebooks). “Leg Butt” 18 Nov 2011, 12:38 PM. Tweet.

boesed:

warbyparker:

Whoa. The MLA has officially devised a standard format to cite tweets in an academic paper. Sign of the times.

ebooks, Horse. (horse_ebooks). “Leg Butt” 18 Nov 2011, 12:38 PM. Tweet.

July 24th
5:00 PM
Via
theparisreview:

English Is Essentially __________.
“English is essentially Norse as spoken by a gang of French thugs.”—Benct Philip Jonsson
“English is essentially a language that uses vowels no other language would accept.”—Luís Henrique
“English is what you get from Normans trying to pick up Saxon girls.”—Bryan Maloney
“English is essentially a French menu stuttered by a fish-and-chips dealer.”—Kala Tunu
“English is essentially the works of Joyce with the hard bits taken out.”—Jon Hanna
“English is essentially all exceptions and no rules.”—Jonathan Bettencourt
—A selection of “Essentialist Explanations.” Thanks to the Penguin Press for pointing out this gem.

theparisreview:

English Is Essentially __________.

“English is essentially Norse as spoken by a gang of French thugs.”—Benct Philip Jonsson

“English is essentially a language that uses vowels no other language would accept.”—Luís Henrique

“English is what you get from Normans trying to pick up Saxon girls.”—Bryan Maloney

“English is essentially a French menu stuttered by a fish-and-chips dealer.”—Kala Tunu

“English is essentially the works of Joyce with the hard bits taken out.”—Jon Hanna

“English is essentially all exceptions and no rules.”—Jonathan Bettencourt

—A selection of “Essentialist Explanations.” Thanks to the Penguin Press for pointing out this gem.

July 23rd
9:29 PM
Via
May 21st
1:35 AM
Via
vesuvii:


cartographies:

Hmmm. I see this graphic being reblogged all over the place. And while I went through a phase where I believed that it mattered (while reading The Scarlet Letter, most notably) I no longer agree with this dismissive attitude towards interpretation versus authorial intent. Art does not exist in a vacuum; it’s shaped by the culture it was created in and demands examination beyond the curtains were blue. How people interpret art is more interesting at times than the art itself.
Art often lies in the interpretation. Would The Great Gatsby be such a classic if we took it simply as a story well-written story about rich white folks screwing up their lives? No—but it is perceived as an indictment of the Jazz Age, and takes on significance as a result. Authorial intent matters, to be sure, but interpretation and criticism is uniquely helpful in understanding the impact of a work, and in examining the details that make a piece stand apart from the rest.
In short: when the author wrote that the curtains were blue, that may be all that he meant. But to the careful reader, they symbolize something greater; the fact that this character observed those blue curtains provides insight into the way the character thinks and his/her state of mind. And there’s nothing fucking wrong with that.

s e r i o u s l y. there’s a reason why so many authors take forever to write books. they are just writing down a story but a complex web of symbols involving the correct word choice, correct sentence structure, correct everything. it’s hard as fuck. don’t mess.




Reblogging for commentary, because YES. Exactly.

vesuvii:

cartographies:

Hmmm. I see this graphic being reblogged all over the place. And while I went through a phase where I believed that it mattered (while reading The Scarlet Letter, most notably) I no longer agree with this dismissive attitude towards interpretation versus authorial intent. Art does not exist in a vacuum; it’s shaped by the culture it was created in and demands examination beyond the curtains were blue. How people interpret art is more interesting at times than the art itself.

Art often lies in the interpretation. Would The Great Gatsby be such a classic if we took it simply as a story well-written story about rich white folks screwing up their lives? No—but it is perceived as an indictment of the Jazz Age, and takes on significance as a result. Authorial intent matters, to be sure, but interpretation and criticism is uniquely helpful in understanding the impact of a work, and in examining the details that make a piece stand apart from the rest.

In short: when the author wrote that the curtains were blue, that may be all that he meant. But to the careful reader, they symbolize something greater; the fact that this character observed those blue curtains provides insight into the way the character thinks and his/her state of mind. And there’s nothing fucking wrong with that.

s e r i o u s l y. there’s a reason why so many authors take forever to write books. they are just writing down a story but a complex web of symbols involving the correct word choice, correct sentence structure, correct everything. it’s hard as fuck. don’t mess.

Reblogging for commentary, because YES. Exactly.