laura c. 20-something. new nyc resident transplanted from california. theater & english nerd. feminist. television enthusiast. fat activist. queer. a loving cynic.
September 28th
12:23 PM
Via
thecricketchirps:

Mark Rothko, Slow Swirl at the Edge of the Sea, 1944

thecricketchirps:

Mark Rothko, Slow Swirl at the Edge of the Sea, 1944

11:44 AM
Via
deep4d:

Tilt BoxStephen Paul Connor

deep4d:

Tilt Box
Stephen Paul Connor

September 21st
9:25 PM
Via
ryanpfluger:

Michael Chabon out-take for New York Magazine, 2012

ryanpfluger:

Michael Chabon out-take for New York Magazine, 2012

September 19th
5:34 PM
Via
September 17th
10:40 PM
Via

rubdown:

orgasmictipsforgirls:

The third, still awesomely-sexy, ‘Hysterical Literature’ video.

(Where someone recites a piece of writing for as long as she can, while having a vibrator pressed against her, until she finally comes.)

See the other videos here.

I luv these.

Still totally into this project.

6:52 PM
Via
bellatoris:

Vincent van Gogh, ‘Blossoming Almond Tree’, 1809

bellatoris:

Vincent van Gogh, ‘Blossoming Almond Tree’, 1809

1:45 PM
Via

teachingliteracy:

aeternums:

Ophelia’s Skull | Owen W. Lee

The work is a part of a project that aims at re-coding Shakespeare in the 21st century’s vision. The skull represents a well-known tragic character, Ophelia in Hamlet, who is many times used as a symbol of tragic death in a variety of art works in art history. The lyrical, unique literary style has been borrowed to describe the scene by artists. Most of the pieces are mainly focused upon depicting the scene that Queen Gertrude tells people the death from drowning of Ophelia. however, it is deemed that Shakespeare himself is more concentrated upon the dialectic between life and death.The project interactively delivers synesthetic images to audiences with visuals, sounds, textures, scripts and materials. The skull is a straightforward object to symbolise death, simultaneously,the surface is decorated with graceful sentences from the scene of Ophelia’s death in another aspect of the beauty of death.

Inside the skull, a paper strip hand-crank musical box is placed so that audiences can feel the emotion of the tragic beauty in the 16th century renaissance melody and rhythm, which have been reinterpreted and composed by the designer after an analysis of the 16th century’s lute music by John Dowland (England, 1563–1626). The artwork reminds of automata in the 16th–17th century in Europe.The music and the visual are converged upon multi-sensory delivery in an analogue and tactile flavour. This project is now expecting 2nd Version based upon contemporary technology.

theseasonofthewitch:


We don’t owe you shit.

theseasonofthewitch:

We don’t owe you shit.

whimsicalities:

inspirezme:

Do you ever have those days when you just feel like you’re in a funk? You just can’t shake those heavy, sinking feelings? Maybe you’re feeling stressed, empty, scared or stuck. In essence, you just don’t feel like yourself.

As a way to improve mental health in Canada, Blok Design worked with Partners for Mental Health to come up with a way to draw people into a conversation, encouraging an open dialogue. Using bright colors that represented a spectrum of moods, they got people on the street to, literally, wear their emotions on their sleeves.

More photos on Facebook

I have very mixed feelings about this.